Xi Can Teach Trump How To Make America Great Again

When President Xi Jinping meets President Donald Trump this week at Mar-a-Lago, Xi can certainly teach Trump a thing or two about how to make America great again. After all, the Chinese have been trying to make their country great again for the last few hundred years, and the result is apparent.

President Trump may not like it, but Xi’s success story will not be about protectionism and isolationism that seem to have characterized his administration.  Continue reading

Will China Challenge U.S. Global Dominance?

Will China challenge U.S. global dominance? If you had asked me this question two years ago, I would have said “definitely NO.” But now, I am not so sure.

In an article “A Bigger, Bolder China in 2016,” Jeremy Page, Beijing-based Wall Street Journal reporter, wrote:

With Beijing holding the rotating presidency of the Group of 20 nations next year [2016], Chinese President Xi Jinping is expected to press ahead with his drive to challenge U.S. dominance of the global financial and security order.

South-China-SeaPage listed a number of issues: the South China Sea, cybersecurity attacks, Taiwan, and Asia Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB). None are new, but any one of them could potentially spin out of control and result in more tension between the U.S. and China.

In the case of the South China Sea, China hasn’t stopped the constructions on the disputed islands. Continue reading

“Century of Humiliation” Complicates US-China Relationship

The U.S.-China relationship will be in focus as China’s president Xi Jinping comes to the United States for his first state visit this week. The relationship has shown some worrisome signs in recent years – with tensions over the South China Sea, cyber attacks, and other old and new issues.

ObamaXiAt his 2013 meeting with President Obama in California, President Xi Jinping called for a “new kind of major-power relationship,” meaning that the rising power and the established power can cooperate to create a new international order rather than engaging in a dangerous rivalry.

This is a promising concept and the right path for the U.S.-China relationship. However, the two countries’ significant differences in ideologies and worldviews prevent them from seeing eye-to-eye.

To understand these differences, Continue reading